Porter's Five Forces Model: SDLC

1480 Words6 Pages
5.2.1. External Factors The various external forces, which are possibly the most influential, that were affecting the business and the software system during the SDLC and pushing change in the business strategy can be described and categorized using Michael Porter’s Five Forces Model (M. E. Porter, 1979) which describes the threat of new entrants, of bargaining power of buyers, of substitute products and services, of bargaining power of suppliers and that of rivalry among existing competitors. We will attempt to briefly outline illustrations of some of scenarios that manifested during the SDLC. Sometime during the implementation of the original system the business leaders realized a saturation of competitors of both incumbent and new entrants,…show more content…
Organization A, is a non-hierarchical organization, where most of the employees are considered teammates and leaders are only appointed on a per project basis. In this situation the requirement specification from the business on the software production may be a system with logins for users but no permission based system access. Organization B however is a more traditional hierarchical organization where there is a top management, middle management, first line managers and general employees all in one out of several regional offices that are governed by a head office somewhere. In this scenario it is most likely the case that the requirement of the business will include some permission based system access in addition to the users login…show more content…
Having both executable byte-code and the source code for example goes a long in producing a more accurate design in the documentation. It certainly helps the program comprehension process to be able to analyze a running instance of the program alongside its source code, experiencing implementation as the user and looking at how they are implemented at the source code level. Domain knowledge is another thing that may introduce further ease during the reverse engineering process. Generally speaking, domain knowledge can include knowledge and experience from both or either ends of the forward and reverse engineering processes. Hence having encountered the same or similar systems in the past either implementing or reverse engineering them will aid beating dead-ends that result from mysterious or difficult to understand design
Open Document