Mies Van Der Rohe Influence: The Glass House

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3. MIES VAN DER ROHE INFLUENCE 3.1. The Farnsworth House [Fig 19] The Glass House, New Canaan [Fig 20] Farnsworth House, Illinois “The idea of a glass house comes from Mies van der Rohe. Mies had mentioned to me as early as 1945 how easy it would be to build a house entirely of large sheets of glass. I was skeptical at the time, and it was not until I had seen the sketches of the Farnsworth House that I started the three-year work of designing my glass house. My debt is therefore clear, in spite of the obvious difference in composition and relation to the ground.” (Johnson 1950:153) The Glass House, has been considered as a copy of the house that Mies van der Rohe built for Dr. Edith Farnsworth near Chicago. Moreover, some authors,…show more content…
If we take a look at the plans of both houses, we can observe the core as a differential element between them. In the Farnsworth House, the core contains the fireplace and bathroom and all the different areas of the interior, like dining chairs and table, bedroom, living room and kitchen, are arrange around it. Hence, it creates a clear functional diagram. According to Holowka (2009), the size of the core leaves the remaining space around it de read as a “continuous loop” and suggesting “an endless flow”. On the other hand, if we take a look at the Glass House plans, we can locate the core of the house in the solid brick cylinder that contains the hearth and the bathroom. However, the kitchen is treated as a separated element, as a piece of furniture, as if it was not a piece of the “house’s support machinery”. Holowka argues that the small size and pure shape of the cylindrical core makes it look as if it was contained within a much larger and static space. In other words “the greater width and smaller core of the Glass House give it a deeper interior”. Johnson said that this feature in the plan was inspired by a suprematists painting by Kasimir…show more content…
DWELLING THE GLASS HOUSE Phillip Johnson, argued about the importance of the aesthetic side of architecture all through his life. He even claimed that he had no interest in buildings except as works of art (Goldberger 2005). Kevin Melchionne (1998:191) cites Stanley Abercrombie to argue that: “We can live happily with art- some cannot live happily without it- but we cannot live in art or even in a [white cube]” Melchionne (1998:191) understands that we cannot live happily in interiors that are designed entirely for the “aesthetic” sake. Therefore, these spaces lack of any consideration about the way to inhabit them, of livability. In this manner, the Glass House, was built devoted to aesthetics and was conceived as a work of environmental art. Indeed, the house is celebrated as a great architecture. One of the Modernist architects’ desire was to achieve the liberation of the individual by the conception of neutral spaces and the use of transparent walls (Huppatz 2011). Nevetheless, the use of transparent glass is a double-edge, yet it symbolized the deviation from the heavily interiorized middle- class home, it also creates unwanted exposure of the inhabitant (Spark
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