Minor Geniuses Gladwell Analysis

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The Minor Geniuses Introduction: “What the dog saw and other adventures” written by Malcolm Gladwell and published by Little, Brown and Company in 2009, presents nineteen articles by Malcolm Gladwell that originally were published in The New Yorker which are categorized into three parts. The first one, Obsessives, Pioneers, and Other Varieties of Minor Genius”, talks about what Gladwell calls “minor geniuses” (Gladwell, 2009) who are really passionate and good at what they do, but are not really well-know. Second one, Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses, where demonstrates theories, or ways of organizing experience. Finally, the third part Gladwell examines the predictions and perceptions we make about people. What do the pitchman, true…show more content…
Shirley Polykoff was described as flamboyant and brilliant woman, who did not like her natural brown hair, because she thought that did not matched with her personality. In 1956, when she was a junior copywriter, she was given the Claire account. One of the products that this company were launching was Miss Clairol, it was the first hair-color treatment that made possible to lighten, tint, condition, and shampoo your hair at home, in a single step. Miss Clairol gave the ability to the American women, to color their hair in the privacy of their home. Polykoff immediately knew what she wanted to say, she believed that women had the right to be blond and to be able to do it in privacy where others cannot judge them. “Does she or doesn’t she?” became the tagline for Clairol’s revolutionary product (Gladwell, 2009,…show more content…
She was rebellious, unconventional, and independent woman. L’Oréal Company was trying to make an advertising campaign for presenting their new product which was superior to Clairol’s hair treatment. The creative team, in which was Ilon, was having a lot of problems. Everyone was discussing what the ad should be and all ideas were similar to Clairol’s ads. But, Ilon had another idea, she thought that main idea of the campaign must be what women want for them, instead of looking good for men. “Because I’m worth it”, (Gladwell, 2009, p87) was the last line of the commercial and it was powerful, because L’Oréal’s product began stealing market from
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