Mirza Ghalib Analysis

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Mirza Ghalib’s ‘Hazaaron Khwaishein Aisi’ in the light of New Criticism theory Hazaaron khwahishen aisi ke har khwahish pe dam nikle Bohat niklay mere armaan, lekin phir bhi kam nikle Daray kyon mera qaatil? kya rahega us ki gardan par? Voh khoon, jo chashm-e-tar se umr bhar yoon dam-ba-dam nikle Daray kyon mera qaatil? kya rahega us ki gardan par? Voh khoon, jo chashm-e-tar se umr bhar yoon dam-ba-dam nikle….. ENGLISH TRANSLATION Thousands of desires, each worth dying for... many of them I have realized...yet I yearn for more... Why should my killer (lover) be afraid? No one will hold her responsible for the blood which will continuously flow through my eyes all my life We have heard about the dismissal of Adam from Heaven, With a more humiliation, I am leaving the street on…show more content…
He regarded Persian as a superior literary language, suitable for his ambition: ‘‘to polish the mirror and show in it the face of meaning—this … is a mighty work.’’ Then, in 1826, his personal life suffered several blows: his only brother Yusuf went mad, and his father-in-law died. Ghalib’s share of the substantial inheritance came into question because of a long and bitter dispute between two sons of his father-in-law, born of different mothers. Most of Ghalib’s life was a struggle for an income; he employed his poetic skills at various courts, and he indulged in other aristocratic pursuits. In middle age, Ghalib was arrested on a gambling charge, and in 1847, he was imprisoned for running a gaming house. After his release, he was welcomed at court—as he had long wished to be. A little later, he resumed writing in Urdu. His ghazals gained a reputation at mushairas, or poetry contests, for erudition, though some called it obscurantism. Ghalib fared well in the 1850s, and he adopted the sons of his wife’s nephew. In 1854, he received adequate stipends and court appointments. He had become a true
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