Misconceptions Of The Vikings In Today's World

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In today's World Vikings aren’t thought highly of, in many regards other than their ability to fight. And are usually considered to be dirty warriors and pirates with an undeveloped culture. Who had no allegiance or laws to follow. But the Vikings were much more than their stereotype shows them to be. They were also explorers, and entrepreneurs, opening new trade, and spreading Scandinavian Culture across Europe. Throughout the Viking ages the Vikings created many things including extremely well made, and feared weapons, however one of the greatest things they created was the Long ship. The Vikings also weren’t as lawless as people may believe, the Vikings had created a very in depth system of government that operated on local, regional…show more content…
One of the main misconceptions is that the Vikings were a united people and that large amounts of Vikings attacked at a time. In reality most Viking raids had nothing to do with each other. Most raids were performed by individual Viking chieftains and their followers, who had a few maybe only one long ship. Sometimes chieftains would organise a flotilla to perform an organised raid, but mostly chieftains preferred individual raids. Vikings also weren’t just raiders, they were traders, and entrepreneurs. They opened up new avenues of trade reaching to Russia and Scandinavia, even into North America hundreds of years before Columbus “discovered” the…show more content…
There were three types of “things” local, regional, and national (in the case of Iceland). The “Things” were open to all freemen, and at these “things” complaints were heard, decisions were made, and laws were passed. In Iceland the National “Thing” met once a year during the summer at Assembly plain(Þingvellir), a rift valley known both for its historical significance and its beauty. By the time the Settlement era ended Iceland was divided into four regions called quarters(fjórðungar). In each region there were 9 chieftain or goði who had specific responsibilities. The chieftains had no fixed borders, as allegiance to a chieftain was completely voluntary, any free man could change his support to anyone in his district, and with only minor formalities,and if a goði was involved in a feud or a contentious litigation they would often bring a larger group with them incase the proceedings ended with having to require lethal force. Each spring the chieftains met at the regional “thing”, to try, and settle regional disputes, the only thing bigger was the National “thing”. To be able to legally attend a “Thing” a man had to be "able to ride a full-day's journey, and bring in his own hobbled horse after baiting, and find his way by himself where the route is known to him" (Grágás K89). During the National “thing” a law speaker (lögsögumaður) who was chosen by the
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