Mlk Inspiration

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Martin Luther King Imagine if you were an African American during 1963 a time when Martin Luther King was doing his protests, would you support Martin Luther or go to violence? Martin Luther was an inspiration in many ways. He put the Civil Rights Movement into motion and initiated action for equality among different races.. Martin Luther King did many non-violent marches and protests against the black laws. He inspired other Negroes or black people to stand up to the color laws. He inspired others to do multiple boycotts. One boycott was about how Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man. That started a boycott of the buses that lasted a full year. They either walked to work or they had car-pool with other people. His “I Have…show more content…
King did many things to bring people together through peace. When Rosa Parks was arrested, he did a peaceful boycott to protest the color laws on the bus. That boycott lasted for 382 days, and almost the entire African Americans refused to ride the buses. Even when they were doing a peaceful protest and their children and adults were being blasted with water and then them being arrested,but they did not result in violence. The start of the Civil right movement was at the March on Washington on where 250,000 people marched to the Lincoln Memorial, where Martin Luther King gave his famous “I have a Dream” speech. In the crowd at the March on Washington, they had undercover marshals in the crowd to keep the peace, but “the marchers chose peace that sunny Wednesday” (www.history.com Civil Rights Movement). If they hadn’t chosen peace like Malcolm X did, and then the problem would have just gotten worse. The marches and protests were important stepping stones to pass the civil rights. So Martin Luther King brought many people together through his many boycotts, marches, and peaceful protests. They peacefully protested against the political and social injustice. He started his nonviolent protests by the teachings of Ghandi. Martin Luther said after a visit about nonviolence “I am more convinced than ever before that the method of nonviolent resistance is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for justice and human dignity.” (Crash Course
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