Mlk Letter From Birmingham Jail

1274 Words6 Pages

Madison Clappas “Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline,” voiced Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his I Have a Dream Speech. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wanted freedom for his Black brothers and sisters, but he knew it needed to be done in a peaceful manner. He knew he had to fight the way society was built, also known as social order. Civil rights activists need to challenge unjust social order by protesting and writing literature which can have both positive and negative consequences. In 1963, people fought the oppressive social order with violence which made the situation worse, so people found creative …show more content…

He wrote a Letter from Birmingham Jail, which helped spread his message of fighting injustice with peace. The letter even inspired countless people as shown in the article 1963: The Year that Changed Everything, “In April of that year–from behind the bars of a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama–Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., wrote a message that would inspire countless others” (254). This proves he used literature as a way to spread his message and fight social order through inspiration. In fact, about a month later, over 1000 Black students were inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s letter. They marched through Kelly Ingram Park, in a famous stand named the Children’s March. This event helped bring awareness to the situation they faced in Birmingham. Finally, on August 28th, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his I Have a Dream Speech. Through his empowering voice, he brought people together and reinforced his reasons for challenging social order. For example, in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s I Have a Dream Speech, he states, “We must not allow …show more content…

On April 12th, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others peacefully gathered outside the 16th Street Baptist Church and marched on Birmingham’s City Hall. He was arrested for protesting racial segregation even though the First Amendment protects citizens’ right to a peaceful assembly and protest. In Letter From Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King Jr. mentions his arrest, “For instance, I have been arrested on a charge of parading without a permit” (277). Additionally, he explained how he was unjustly thrown into a dirty, cramped jail cell for protesting his rights and freedom. He challenged social order and was treated with disrespect. Along with that, the children who participated in the Children’s March were met with violence and cruel consequences, even though they were not rioting or destroying property. Policemen attacked them with dogs and blasted them off their feet with fire hoses’ water. Some of them were even thrown into jail cells. For example, in The Children’s March documentary, the policemen released vicious dogs. In one circumstance, the dog lunged at the throat of a smaller child and hit and bit him. This proves how dangerous it was for them to protest. They wanted a brighter future for themselves where they would have fair rights and be treated as equals, yet they were met with violence. Later, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his

Open Document