The Model Of Human Occupation (MOHO)

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The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) was first developed in the 1980s by Gary Kielhofner. Since then, other occupational therapists have also been involved in its further development, revision and refinement of the concepts. MOHO is an occupation-focused framework that aims to explain aspects of engaging in occupations and how illness and disability related problems arise. MOHO is said to be client-centred, evidence based and holistic in nature. Evidence indicates that the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) is the most widely used occupation focused model nationally and internationally (Brown G.T et al 2005). This uptake positively mirrors the emphasis on the occupation-focused practice that reflects the profession’s…show more content…
The model of human occupation has become widely used throughout the world due to substantial efforts to develop, study and integrate it into practice, education and research. Roitman & Ziv ( 2004) stated that use of this model is evident in practice settings where its serves as a framework for intervention in psychiatric, physical rehabilitation, pediatric, psychogeriatric and community based settings. Furthermore, using MOHO allows therapists to comply with govenmental policies which require rehabilitation practices to be based on scientific research and incorporate valid clinical tools and theoretical framework.Interestingly,as application in pediatrics areas, MOHO apply the concepts of view of the person in aspect of volition as the motivation for occupation.The MOHO has a strong emphasis on a person’s dynamic intrinsic adaptation resulting from occupational participation.There is also a focus on the client as a dynamic agent of change and mastery over the…show more content…
Firstly, in term of application of intervention, the therapist should consider whether the priority is short-term improvement in performance components and skills, or long-term occupational adaptation and engagement issues. Subsequently, the model may change for intervention after goals are set.For example, a school therapist treating a child who has high functioning autism spectrum disorder and a sensory processing disorder may find that the short term goal is to improve occupational performance and the immediate focus is on adapting the classroom, training a classroom aide and advocating for the child, Canadian Model Occupation Performance may be utilize as the organizing model of practice. However, MOHO may be a useful model in the long-term, when the overarching goal shifts to building self-efficacy and a positive occupational identity as a student and friend in the school setting, leading to occupational adaptation. In other aspects, MOHO only provides guidelines for working with the child,compared to other model such as the PEOP and CMOP-E. Both provide guidelines for their usage in organizations and communities, which is useful in the growing trend of occupational therapists working with communities and populations. Furthermore, cited by Geist et al ( 1997) indicate that therapists have often not been able to adequately assess and
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