Modern Conflict Theory

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Marx maintained that the fundamental reality of history and modern society is a conflict between the classes. The haves use every tool available, including coercion and ideology, to sustain their advantageous position over the have not’s (Roberts, 1990). Understanding modern industrial society does not necessitate an analysis of cultural values and beliefs. The basic issue is economic conflict. Hence, Marx is often identified as the father of modern conflict theory (Roberts, 1990). He maintained that values and beliefs basically operate (after the fact) to justify the self- interests of various groups. Along this line, Marx viewed religion as an ideology that justified the current social arrangements (Roberts, 1990). It served as a tool of…show more content…
Nearly 80% of South Africa’s population follows the Christian faith (Pocket Guide to South Africa, 2012), other major religions are the Hindus, Muslims, Jews and Buddhists. Hinduism had been introduced by the slaves and servants moved in by the Dutch from the Indian subcontinent (South Africa Tours and Travel, 2005). Islam was introduced through the Cape Malay slaves of the Dutch colonists. The majority of Islam believers are of Indian ancestry while Buddhism was introduced through a number of Chinese and Indian immigrants and the Bahá'í Faith was introduced in 1911 (South Africa Tours and Travel, 2005). Judaism in South Africa came to exist some time prior to the discovery of the Cape of Good Hope, by way of the participation of Jewish astronomers and cartographers in the Portuguese discovery of the sea-route to India (South Africa Tours and Travel, 2005). The major religions of people of Indian origin are Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism, Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Judaism, Jainism, and the Baha’i Faith (South African History…show more content…
The first Muslims in the country settled in the Cape peninsula as slaves around the 1600, under apartheid in the 1940s Muslims were restricted to different spatial localities characterized by race (South African History Online). In this period, much of their investments in religious amenities were either abandoned or destroyed due to the notorious Group Areas Act which sought to keep races apart (South African History Online). In spite of this setback, Muslims were able to reconstruct their religious identity by rebuilding their places of worship and religious amenities through a system of charity known as Zakaat a considerable number of mosques, cultural amenities religious schools and were established to preserve their religious identity and way of life. With Westernization, there was increasing fear that the next generation of youth will lose their sense of religious identity, an effort was made to help youth to preserve their identity in schools through compulsory religious education through vernacular
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