Pros And Cons Of Corporate Lobbying

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DIRECTIONS: Please answer specifically and cite the readings or articles provided to support your reasoning! BE SURE to follow these directions: Do not write an essay. Label and answer the questions. Your ability to answer the questions based on the readings logically and cohesively are key to an "A." Be careful to refrain from generalizations and/or making statements without any well reasoned back support. In short, I will be looking for smart, carefully organized work that flows from strong thesis sentences, well developed support AND logical conclusions. 1. Identifyissue(s):integrity? reputation? social responsibility? 2. Identify the decision-making model(s): universalist? Utilitarian? 3. Identify whether there is any…show more content…
Drutman (2016) surveyed corporate lobbyists and asked them why their companies maintained a Washington office, and the main reason was “to protect the company against changes in government policy” and behind was the “Need to improve ability to compete by seeking favorable changes in government policy.” In other words, companies can use lobbying to make the government serve them, thereby eliminating an important check-and-balance against super stakeholders with millions of funds like Monsanto. Consequently, Pompeo’s bill is a sign of lobbying because it supports exactly what Monsanto and other manufacturers want, to continue hiding GMO ingredients from public knowledge. The bill “would require the Food and Drug Administration to conduct a safety review of new plant varieties from genetic engineering before they enter the food chain, and allow the FDA to require labeling if it believes it necessary to protect consumer health and safety,” and also, “Companies that want to produce and identify non-GMO food would do so voluntarily, but producers would not be required to say their products came from GMOs” (Raasch, 2015). The bill is a yes to what Monsanto…show more content…
Utilitarianism would argue that the most number of people should be happy with corporate lobbying’s results, not just shareholders and corporate management. Companies should then lobby with all stakeholders in mind and consider long-run effects to maximize gains. In addition, corporate lobbying should prioritize social responsibility above making short-run profits. I think it is possible to satisfy all of these stakeholders as their interests do not necessarily have to oppose one another. Profit maximization can be aligned with corporate social responsibility. An example is Monsanto. Instead of lobbying to stop GMO labeling, it can support GMO labeling and continue its marketing of the benefits of GMO products while at the same time eliminating the ones that show evidence of environmental harms. As a result, it satisfies consumers and Vermont, supports farmers and the environment, and protects shareholders. References Drutman, L. (2016, April 20). How corporate lobbyists conquered American democracy. The Atlantic.com. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/04/how-corporate-lobbyists-conquered-american-democracy/390822/ Raasch,
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