Montresor's Psychopath

602 Words3 Pages
Fortunato had blindly stared Montresor in the eyes, oblivious to the flames dancing inside them. Montresor wore a mask of innocence, but behind the mask was the face of Satan, dressed with hatred, and it held no remorse for those it plotted against. The man was a monster, and wisely sported his innocent smile to hide his devilish smirk. Montresor, a savage, yet clever creature, was hungry for the suffering of his enemy, and Montresor MADE his enemies punish. He made them punish deeply, and he punished them with impunity. Without a doubt, Montresor from the Cask of Amontillado is a psychopath. Montresor is a psychopath for many reasons such as that he manipulated his foe to the extreme, he has an absence of remorse, and he also displays shallow…show more content…
One of the traits of a psychopath is manipulation, which Montresor displayed frequently throughout the story. Montresor used glib and self charm to manipulate Fortunato, both characteristics of psychotic behavior. Not to mention Montresor acted kindly towards Fortunato, though Montresor really only wanted Fortunado to endure the consequences of his actions and suffer though utmost misery. Montresor also exhibited pathological lying, for he was deceptive and extremely dishonest. Montresor found Fortunato 's weakness and used it to his own advantage. Many psychopaths are manipulative of their victims, and Montresor is no exception. (Poe, Edgar…show more content…
Most psychopaths feel no guilt after they commit crimes, and Montresor was cold hearted throughout the entire story. The thought of Fortunado slowly dying in the old catacombs under his home rather pleased Montresor. It excited him, and Montresor was quite enthusiastic about Fortunato 's death. In the story, Fortunato 's intoxication was wearing off, and after Montresor had laid a few layers of stone to conceal Fortunato, Montresor heard low, agonizing moans from inside. "The noise lasted for several minutes, during which, that I might hearken to it with the more satisfaction, I ceased my labours and sat down upon the bones." (Poe, Edgar Allen) When Montresor said those words in the story, it showed to Poe’s audience how much the slow, torturous death of Fortunato gratified Montresor. A little later, after Montresor had layered the stones near his breast level, Fortunato burst out in a fit of loud, shrill screams. Montresor, once again feeling great satisfaction, bolted back with a louder clamour, that eventually silenced Fortunato. (Poe, Edgar
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