Morality In Catcher In The Rye

1746 Words7 Pages
A discovery is rarely the endpoint, rather it catalyses an inevitable chain reaction of subsequent discoveries. It is through this domino effect of discovering, that allows us to gain new perceptions of the world, new values and understanding of ourselves and others. The importance of morality, growth and loss of innocence, each precursors to discovering new ideas, which extrapolated in William Shakespeare 's 1661 tragicomedy of ‘The Tempest, ‘Sky High’ by Hannah Roberts and J.D. Salinger’s ‘Catcher in the Rye’ (1951). This notion is shown in William Shakespeare’s 1661 tragicomedy of ‘The Tempest’ (1611), in which it elucidates the transformative power of meaningful discoveries that manifest an individual 's desire to re-evaluate…show more content…
Discoveries are often significant as they challenge the individual to reconsider what they previously believed in order to theorise about their world and make new connections surrounding themselves and others, such reevaluation can often lead to the development of a greater understanding regarding morality. This concept is exemplified through J.D Salinger’s ‘Catcher in the Rye’, were a young teenager, Holden Caulfield is constantly reaffirming his passion for preserving the innocence of the youth from “phonies”. The value that he places on morality is illustrated by his persistent quest to stop transgression. However, Holden does not realise he is a phony himself, “Her son was doubtless the biggest bastard that ever went to Pencey... "May I ask your name, dear?" "Rudolf Schmidt," I told her.” Through the utilisation of dialogue and an derisive tone, it highlights Holden’s phoniness of indulging Mrs. Morrow with lies, even though he strongly stated that he despised phony people. Despite, his hypocrisy of being phony, the novel evidently emphasises Holden paradigm of morality an an important concept that protects the young, innocent children from the corrupt adults. “Somebody‟d written “F*** you” on the wall. It drove me damn near crazy.” The utilisation of an aggressive tone and informal language, suggests Holden’s anger towards the attitudes and values of society due to his ideal visualised in innocent children. Hence, illuminates how Holden despises immoral, vulgar…show more content…
This is illustrated within Robert’s ‘Sky High’, which effectively conveys the idea that discoveries can have unexpected impacts on sense of self at they cause a reconsideration of values. Robert journeys from a youthful sense of innocent to the sense of knowledge and wisdom that comes with age. Nevertheless, with wisdom it is accompanied by regret and melancholy, as the individual recognises that their past discoveries will inevitably provide them a new perception. Hannah Roberts comes to the realisation that childhood is to be valued in its innocence and purity. Through the cumulative effect of imagery the composer expresses their idea of change. The compose reminisces of the simple joys of life experienced as a child and the magical significance in a child’s eye of inanimate object. “The best climbing tree stood proud on a small mould of concrete, festooned with socks and knickers” suggest she is imaging the tree as a place of happy thoughts, where she could reminisce her childhood memories. However, is juxtaposed by the “sagging wires” and “spitted metallic arms”, the use of personification, illustrates the change in the individual and thus realising that there is more to her known world of childhood and innocence and enhancing her understanding of her reality of adulthood. Hence, providing the audience the idea that Roberts travel to her past in attempt to reignite a desire for her loss of innocence. Ultimately, causing a permanent change in self as individuals must
Open Document