Morality In The Handmaid's Tale

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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood tells a story revolving around a young woman in a post-war economy run by the church, where if a woman fails to produce a child she is sentenced to death. The morals in The Handmaid's Tale are twisted by religion, countless women hung or physically shamed for expressing themselves or refusing to procreate with a man much older than them. Margaret Atwood is skilling in writing post-apocalyptic or future-oriented stories of what could be, something even more prevalent in her novel Oryx and Crake. The story is narrated through the eyes of a man named ‘Snowman’, or Jimmy which is his birth given name, and follows the events that lead to the dystopian society that he currently resides in. Immorality is a major…show more content…
Acts of immorality like eating your household pet Spot or Mr. Mittens, in reality, would have little effect on the people in Oryx and Crake. Instead, the scientists and Government support the acts in favor of money and human development. Pigoons, a pig, and a pigeon hybrid meant to grow organs compatible with humans, something that would end organ failure before it happens or replace grandma’s heart when she has a heart attack. While the Pigoons offer much to humans, they suffer in captivity and harvested for their organs, and then disposed of. As a child Jimmy would visit the Pigoons at his father’s work and recalls how they looked at him, “They glanced up at him as if they saw him, really saw him, and might have plans for him later”(Jimmy, 26). These animals are intelligent yet creatures not designed to have ever existed. Crake Chickienobs which are genetically modified chickens without a brain, only the instinct to eat and irregularly long bodies without feathers, chickens without heads made entirely for consumption. Humanity playing God through supposed divine action is simply humans capitalizing through manipulative
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