Case Study Jordan Belford

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Jordan Belford violated many laws and regulations appointed by the SEC (U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission). The SEC's primary responsibility is enforcing the federal securities laws, proposing securities rules, regulating the securities industry as well as the nation's stock and options exchanges. Belford used knoweldge to gain power, therby concentrating wealth in a smaller group – harming the overall societal satisfaction. H1 – The market can not function without morality H2 – Moral obedience leads to overall societal satisfaction (the bigger good) 3. The dilemma of whether everything should be regulated by the free market (which many now advocate) without other regulators or with minimal influence of the state. It is true that the market has a tendency to be as efficient as possible. For example, taxes paid by earners have proven to be much better than rigid regulations. But the question arises, how far do we want to go? For example, it is alright to commercialize the inscriptions on public transport vehicles, but should these labels be placed on emergency medical vehicles or police cars? There were attempts to do it, but they failed. There is a moral dilemma…show more content…
For sure class differentiation is already happening, but this would take drastic proportions. It is a question that strikes the heart of justice. From the above, it is morally and ethically to set boundaries and limitations. If there were no limitations the rich and less wealthy could simply buy justice. For example. Cut someone's arm or leg away out of pure fun and pay that person and the police (government authorities) to get away with it, as simply as that. There is a moral dilemma about whether the sale of organs (eg. The kidney) should be permitted, which would save someone's life or contribute to the quality of life (but is prohibited in our

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