Mother-Daughter Relationships In Toni Morrison's Beloved

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2-Mother-Daughter Relationship: When Baby Suggs dies, Sethe is left alone to raise her adolescent daughter and to deal with Beloved's rage. Sethe's explanations of her filicide are condemned even by Beloved herself. The baby ghost of Beloved could not detach from Sethe for so long. Beloved's intention is to get her mother's attention so that she fixes her eyes on Sethe and began following her wherever she goes. The obsession Beloved creates about Sethe became a strategy of revenge. She suffered separation at an early age, and thus she is obsessed by the idea of a reunion. Since she cannot return to her mother's womb, Beloved seeks reunion through death. She began torturing her mother and blaming her for the ruthless behavior of filicide: The bigger Beloved got, the smaller Sethe became; the brighter Beloved's eyes, the more those eyes that used never to look away became slits of sleeplessness.…show more content…
After Baby Suggs died and her brothers disappear, Denver tries to learn how to live with her mother just to not be the second victim in 124 Bluestone Road "I love my mother but I know she killed one of her own daughters, and tender as she is with me, I'm scared of her because of it… I spent all of my outside self loving Ma'am so she wouldn't kill me, loving her even when she braided my head at night" (Morrison 392; 397). Because of Sethe's insufficient nurturing, Denver lives a "paralyzing infantilism" (Philip 139). She pays for her mother's bloody past which affects her psychological development. Denver, who has fragile personality, is trapped in childhood. She lives most of her life entombed within the walls of her house because she views the outside world as a place where "things so bad had happened" (Morrison 460). Denver does not avoid reaching the outside world only; she also stops speaking and listening, a strategy that she thinks can protect her from being
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