Mother Relationship In Difficult Daughter

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INDIAN CULTURAL IMPACT ON DAUGHTER –MOTHER RELATIONSHIP IN MANJU KAPUR’S DIFFICULT DAUGHTERS AND ANITA NAIR’S LADIES COUPE We all know well life is nothing all about relationship. We are part in social and cultural values so we are expected to follow certain commitments which laid in the society. Among these the most sensitive, emotional and psychologically committed relationship is Daughter-mother relation even though this postmodern techonological world contains lesbians-gay and live-in together relationship, it appears little outdated to talk about daughter mother relationship. But still indisputably it is the only single relationship that has the toughest bearing on a woman’s life and experience. But it loaded with complex and diverse…show more content…
The daughter of two generations tries to explore themselves by rejecting the idiotic norms of tradtional soceity thus they are branded as “Difficult Daughter” both within the family and soceity. Therefore it would be interesting to discover the complex dynamics of mother-daughter ties in the Indian traditional patriarchal milieu. Thus these two novels clearly manifests the imbalances as well as distortions in evaluating the lot of mothers and daughters in the Indian…show more content…
Now live in it, Mama, and leave me be. Do not haunt me any more” (Kapur 280). Manju Kapur’s novel, Difficult Daughters, thus touches various dimensions of motherdaughter relationship. Initially, the daughter, belonging to the same sex, identifies herself with the mother. “Women as children are able to identify with their mothers quite strongly” (Panja 61). Then a stage comes when in her attempt to assert her identity, the daughter breaks away from the mother and feels alienated. However, when the same daughter, after being an experienced self, looks back at the past of her mother, she realizes what it is to be a mother in a patriarchal society. In this way, again an identification and understanding takes place between the daughter and the mother. In this regard, Asha Choubey’s observation is worth quoting: As a child she [Virmati] keeps craving for a little understanding from her mother but with the passing of time she learns to accept the situation as it is. This mother-daughter relationship marches from identification to alienation. Years after Ida – the daughter of Virmati – relives her relation with her mother, marching from alienation to identification.
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