Mysticism In Medea

673 Words3 Pages
Never Underestimate A Woman
In Medea, Euripides portrays Medea’s character as a very knowledgeable woman. Medea clearly interprets the characteristics of mysticism to the Athenian audience. Euripides, a powerful tragedian uses Medea’s rhetoric to get a medium of revenge. Medea is partially divine and has a type of sorcery, which leads to the persuasion of being able to stay an extra day and have a master plan to kill Creon, the princess and her children. Creon, the king of Corinth wants Medea and her children to go to Exile. "I’m afraid of you. You could hurt my daughter, even kill her. Every indication points that way. You’re wise by nature, you know evil arts, and you’re upset because your husband’s gone away from your bedroom” (794). Creon knows for a fact the damage she is
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She knows deep inside that her children going to exile will not give them life at all. Even if they stayed with their father, the children will not be treated as royalty and will not have a bright future. Therefore, she knows that her children will not live a happy life. In her defense, she tells Jason that she did not murder her children. She murdered only his. Medea is very smart because it is true. In their time, mother can give birth, but when the child is born it is no longer hers, it’s her husband’s child. Medea’s strategies came along exactly how she desired. She was grieving and could not bear the pain that her husband left with another woman. She was knowledgable in many ways and knew what each action would cause in effect. While many think her acts were monstrous, I know that before she decided to kill Creon, the bride and her children she knew that it will bring her at peace and destroy her husband. Medea knew that a life in exile was no life at all and she did not want that for her children and that the royal family wouldn’t accept them
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