Mythology In Ancient Greece

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Mythology is a “family” of myths from a particular type of religion. The people in Rome and Greece mostly worshipped this particular groupings of myths. They had gods for just about everything because they thought they were only puny humans, but the gods were almighty and powerful. They also believed that the gods were all the forces of nature. Being that there were gods for the sun, wind, earth, sky, and many more. “The greek myths were old, spoken stories, and later written down in 8 BC” (Mars). That is what mythology is and how the stories came to be. Ares had many relationships, and some children are not to be trifled with, his parents, Zeus and Hera, the king and queen, who both hated him (Ares). As stated by the record of an ancient poet by the name of Homer (Ares). Ares had blood bound sisters, Eris, goddess of discord, and Hebe, goddess of youth, and his practical opposite, Athena, his half-sister (Ares). Aphrodite, the goddess of love, had an affair on Hephaestus with Ares (Ares). When Hephaestus caught wind, from Helios, of his wife being with his brother behind his back, he devised a trap and caught them in the act (Ares). Ares had children with Aphrodite, Eros, known as…show more content…
His Roman worship was better than his Greek worship, because the Romans thought of him as their father, and someone that would aid them, and the Greeks feared Ares for his lust of ,sometimes, unwanted bloodshed (Mars). When Ares was chained by the giants, was a period of peace between two countries sealed by two brass coins in a jar (Ares). Ares was in many wars, but the one that stands out is the Trojan War, when he was always on Aphrodite’s side (Ares). Ares fought for a man named Hector against Achilles, who was given gifts from the gods, and a spear from Athena (Ares). Achilles killed Hector, out of rage, for earlier Hector had killed Patroclus (Ares). Concluding that Ares doesn 't have much worship in Greece, but loved in Rome as Mars, like their

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