Nat Turner Slave Revolt

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Renata Higuera Nat Turner Essay US History- Mr. Chen Before 1831, few and uncommon significant slave revolts occurred in North America, despite the comparatively substantial slave population. Many southern slave owners accredited this aspect of American slave culture to the supposed approval, complacency and passivity of their slaves, and though most knew of the major insurrections in other countries, they probably felt that they had assured certain control over their slaves. Nat Turner’s rebellion abolished this notion entirely. This rebellion demonstrated slaves’ capability of organizing and planning resistance and showed that they were not always willing to accept oppression. Though the revolt was unsuccessful in that it was extinguished…show more content…
After the massacre happened, slaves were seen as a threat, and the white population became extremely afraid and cautious of their actions. The relations between classes became tougher and much more strict. Slaves were seen as a potential threat, which could revolt and continue the revolution previously paused by the government. In addition, a few white people who previously questioned slavery now changed their perception and saw it as something beneficial, as it could restrain Africans from acting freely; therefore, dangerously. However, the rebellion caused many people who were in favor of slavery, and also against it, to unite in a common fear, a bigger consent, which affected all white people in America. They believed slaves would overturn again against them which would result in many more slaughters and rebellions. They feared more aggression would happen, and they were scared that it slavery was continued, more harm would happen to the white population, as they created enormous contempt in a community that exponentially…show more content…
The revolt forced the Virginia legislature to openly discuss the idea of emancipation, which is “the fact or process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions; liberation” according to the English dictionary. A much smaller portion of the southern population reached to the conclusion that Nat Turner’s rebellion signaled that slavery should be abolished. This led to a debate in Virginia, which unfortunately the white politicians of that time decided to be against freedom, equality, and emancipation. Instead, they opted for much harsher slave codes including rigorous restrictions and limits on the movement of black slaves, black congregations and the communication of black preachers toward other slaves. Nat Turner was a preacher so Floyd, which was the Governor at that time, and many other leaders believed that the best way to stop future revolts was to restrict black preachers who otherwise would had access and influence over a wide swath of the black populace. However, the idea that slavery and inequality was the reason for violence is what affected overall politically. As a small portion of the population actually believed and encouraged this concept, they forwarded this message to more and more people, which, after a long time, were convinced this was true and helped with the eventual future
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