National Parks Are Sacred

763 Words4 Pages
National parks are places that have a lot of history, in fact a lot of national parks have specific places that native americans call sacred. Those sacred places usually have markers on them or around them to let people know that they are sacred. Many if not all of those sacred places are believed to have a strong spiritual presence there. Many of the sacred places also have a backstory that tells why those places are sacred. Native americans have marked these specific places sacred and some of those sacred places have a story behind why they’re sacred. Some of these sacred places have no story behind them at all only because they were lost in translation. For example spirit mountain rising to an elevation of 5,639 feet above sea level, and…show more content…
He was well known for being a farmer, inventor, sheepherder, naturalist, explorer, writer, and conservationist. He was what people would call a national park activist in a way because he wrote about it so much. Muir 's childhood was a little “rough” I would say because Muir 's father was a harsh disciplinarian and worked his family from dawn to dusk. Whenever they were allowed a short period away from the plow and hoe, Muir and his younger brother would roam the fields and woods of the rich Wisconsin countryside. John became more and more the loving observer of the natural word. He also became an inventor, a carver of curious but practical mechanisms in wood. He made clocks that kept accurate time and created a wondrous device that tipped him out of bed before dawn. In 1860, Muir took his inventions to the state fair at Madison, where he won admiration and prizes. Also that year he entered the University of Wisconsin. He made fine grades, but after three years left Madison to travel the northern United States and Canada, odd-jobbing his way through the yet unspoiled land. In later years he turned more seriously to writing, publishing 300 articles and 10 major books that recounted his travels, expounded his naturalist philosophy, and beckoned everyone to "Climb the mountains and get their good tidings." Muir 's love of the high country gave his writings a spiritual quality. His readers, whether they be presidents,…show more content…
Nation parks today are seen as very amazing places where people go to view the wildlife and landscapes, but it wasn’t always like that. Back in the days around Roosevelt 's term in office national parks were used to fuel mass production of wooden products until Roosevelt started to conserve them. Theodore Roosevelt, often called "the conservation president," impacted the National Park System well beyond his term in office. He doubled the number of sites within the National Park system. As President from 1901 to 1909, he signed legislation establishing five new national parks: Crater Lake, Oregon; Wind Cave, South Dakota; Sully 's Hill, North Dakota (later re-designated a game preserve); Mesa Verde, Colorado; and Platte, Oklahoma (now part of Chickasaw National Recreation Area). However another Roosevelt enactment had a broader effect: the Antiquities Act of June 8, 1906. The Antiquities Act enabled President Roosevelt and succeeding Presidents to proclaim historic landmarks, historic or prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest in federal ownership as national monuments. The conservation legacy of Theodore Roosevelt is found in the 230 million acres of public lands he helped establish during his presidency. Much of that land - 150 millions acres - was set aside as national forests. Roosevelt created the present-day USFS in 1905, an organization within the Department of Agriculture. The idea was to conserve forests for continued use. An
Open Document