Nationalism And Globalization

1369 Words6 Pages
In this paper, the concepts of the ‘global’ and the ‘national’ will be considered with respect to one another, asking whether the two can successfully function simultaneously and, in particular, what threat an increasingly globalized world (incorporating advances in technology, communication, freedom of movement, economics and politics) poses for politics and ideology on the national level such as the importance of the state actor in politics and the ideology of nationalism. The paper will firstly consider the impact of globalization upon the role of the nation state, before moving on to discussing what this may potentially mean for ideology. It will argue that although the process of globalization has decreased the amount of power held by…show more content…
Indeed, the ability of individuals to migrate across national borders which technology and international agreements has brought with it has, in turn, aggravated some nationalist groups. For example, although the EU has allowed its citizens freedom of movement, thus allowing international borders to relax and the process of globalization to continue. This has provoked a substantial rise in the popularity of nationalist parties throughout Europe. Here, therefore, we see an example of simultaneous and strongly related growth of both the process of globalization and the force of nationalism. Even in supposedly liberal states which are well embedded into the global system, nationalist policies and language are often used within popular politics. This would imply that nationalist ideas continue to be well ingrained into the culture of many societies. For example, the idea of American exceptionalism and the link between US foreign policy with religiosity within the United States. Wealth, it appears, does not necessarily bear a direct correlation with an opposition to nationalism. Given that many of the benefits sought after through globalization are economic and yet even the richest countries still contain nationalist feeling, the argument is enhanced for the stoicism of nationalism in the face of…show more content…
‘Freedom of movement’ means much less to one who holds an Afghan or Somali passport than a British one due to visa restrictions for example, and many of the quality of life improvements brought about by globalization are only strongly obvious in Western consumerist societies - citizens of LEDC’s which have been exploited for their natural resources, or provide the West with cheap ‘sweatshop’ labor are more likely to be sceptical of the potential of globalization for good. Further, many international conflicts are caused not by global politics or economics but by clashes of powerful national allegiances. In recent history, nationalist wars and uprisings have taken place in Ireland, Rwanda, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Puerto - to name a few. Indeed, often poorer countries would seem to have been ‘left behind’ by globalization’s progress, and one of the most common arguments against further globalization is that globalization maintains an international capitalist system which is oppressive to states which find themselves at the bottom of the international class system. The desire for state and individual actors alike within such countries to maintain a sense of national identity and as much power as a state as possible in order to push back against any potential economic exploitation would seem
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