Nationalism In Sports

1378 Words6 Pages
In Ireland there is an immense culture pride in athletics, more specifically the GAA, it creates identity for the people to associate themselves with. Sports are closely bound up with societal structure, ritual, and culture; they are created within the boundaries of society. The Gaelic Athletic Association – the GAA – creates a sense of solidarity for the people; Irelands deep cultural roots can be seen in their sports. Ireland is a culturally deep nation focused on their Gaelic past; they developed ritualistic celebrations – through their sports – as a way to connect with that specific culture. Ireland has been one of few states that have a sporting scene still devoted to their nations games rather than being overcome by international sports. This paper is going to examine the deep connection between sports and Irish nationalism and its evolution through a number of variables: the creation of the GAA, Rule 42, Croke Park, and Irish contemporary national identity. The GAA was created and “[used] in intellectual warfare between two cultures”; it was created as a way for Ireland to create its own identity – and boost it nationalism - dependent from Britain. Gaelic sports and the…show more content…
Cusack – who was the main influence in creating the GAA – believed that English sports created an atmosphere that promoted dominance and elitism as a result eliminating the ability for the bulk of native Irishmen access to play the sports they loved. Croke also believed that the creation of the GAA was necessary for Irish nationalism because he believed that if they “continued travelling …in the same direction that [they] have taken for some time past, condemning the sports that were practiced by [their] forefathers, effacing [their] national features, as though [they] were ashamed of them, and putting
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