Native American Culture Analysis

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Throughout natives’ history, the indigenous are always interacting with the common theme of assimilation. Before the arrival of the early European explorers, life in the so-called Old World was civilized and different Natives tribes live in their specific regions. Even though each tribe do not always get along and in contact with warfare through imperialism, it was not part of a bigger picture issue that they have to take a look over (McCall, 7). This was just simply a common act that was viewed among the natives as part of an everyday common life event. With the Europeans arrived to their lands, their normal civilized life started to be disrupted and they slowly started to assimilate into the colonial power nations society’s expectations.…show more content…
Many colonial powers change the Indian’s way of life. However, when the United States gained its own independence from Great Britain, this integration problem still not resolved. As the American government gained control almost all indigenous lands, assimilation has become forceful act for the Indians to follow for survival. Compare to the early arrival of the Europeans, integration with the Americans in the contemporary period have caused the Indians to become increasingly more frustrated and resentment over time. The relation to the colonial times for integration was friendlier in some aspects even when violence is used to solve the issue. Over the years, assimilation of the Indians became more mentally distorting with their…show more content…
Through the process of “kill the Indian and Save the Man”, these acts may be viewed as inhuman and evil to the Indians’ point of view, but this change has brought Indians to be able to communicate their concerns with the United States government effectively than before. For example, John Ross’s defense of the Cherokee freedom was to send a petition to President Andrew Jackson, though it did not succeed in gaining Cherokee’s rights, he still communicate effectively in the petition of the tribes’ concerns. Moreover, by being proficient in speaking in English, Natives have less to worry about lack of representation due to language barrier. In the boarding school, students are better English speakers and “got employed the knowledge and skills they acquired in their subsequent careers” (Calloway, 457). Even though these careers are not so great job, Indians in these job titles are in better position than those who do not have the knowledge and skills for the
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