Native American Settlers Conflict Analysis

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The very first years of Anglo American settlers in the Americas were filled with conflict between the indigenous people and the settlers. This conflict was due to a difference in ideals, religion, and way of life. Another factor that contributed to the conflict between the Native Americans and the European settlers was the Natives inhabiting land that was wanted by the settlers. The European settlers understood that the Native Americans held the land they wanted and they were set on doing anything to acquire said land from the Native Americans. There were many ploys at play that lead to the eventual conquering of land. During the late 18th to 19th century there was a large consensus that something had to be done with the Native Americans.…show more content…
There was a popular assumption, which can be tied to a quote by General Sheridan , that “The only good Indians I ever saw were dead ones.” This quote captures a popular attitude of Anglo-Americans during this time. Due to the constant struggle for resources between the Native Americans and the settlers, wars between the two were inevitable. The white men wanted the lands that belonged to the Native Americans and they were convinced that, because of what they considered the uncivilized nature of the Native Americans, there was no way they could coincide with the Native Americans. This presumption was due to the biased outlooks that the Anglo Americans had toward Native Americans culture. Due to these attitudes toward the Native Americans the settlers set out to acquire their lands. The land that were not taken through the Indian wars and perplexing deeds of sale which were unfair for the Native Americans were coveted by the…show more content…
In the dead of winter, they made the 300-plus-mile trek to a desolate internment camp along the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico called the Bosque Redondo Reservation, where the military maintained an outpost, Fort Sumner. Along the way, approximately 200 Navajos died of starvation and exposure to the elements. Four years later, having endured overcrowded and miserable conditions at Bosque
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