Native Americans Boarding School

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During the late 19th and earlier 20th centuries, many of the Native Americans suddenly had to start changing their way of life in order to live amongst the Anglo-Americans. They were given ultimatums in which if they did not comply with the newly imposed organizations of political, economic, legal, and social institutions, Native Americans had to suffer the consequences. For several centuries, many tribes have passed and those who survived were the ones who did the “tragic, but necessary” actions abide by these organizations and assimilated their way into survival. The Allotment Period was meant to terminate all Native Americans; however, it proved to not only the Anglo-Americans that Native Americans are in fact capable of assimilation, but…show more content…
Anglo-Americans viewed the boarding schools as one of the fastest ways they are able to assimilate the Native Americans into society. A large part of the curriculum was to teach the Native youth that their ancestors were savage peoples which would often create confusion and a mindset that the youth has ‘progressed’ that time of uncivilization. By taking away any notion of Native American culture was how the Anglo-Americans socialized the youth believing that Native heritage is not normal and Western culture was. As I mentioned a while ago, these kids wore gender distinct uniforms, a male’s hair was cut short and female’s hair was tied, taught Christianity, and ate the same foods as the Anglo-Americans did. While many younger children, I’m assuming, would view attending boarding schools as a ‘new adventure’ or ‘change’, there are many older children who despised the thought of attending. Often times these kids were taken from their home and were forced to transport themselves across the country to attend these boarding…show more content…
Was it possible for the Natives to achieve their current state without assimilation? I felt that the need to learn Anglo-American culture was partially crucial to their success of establishing these Indian organizations and the ability to hold court cases. The other motivation was due to the sheer hope and desire that the Native American peoples will be recognized as actual people and functioning members of society. They aren’t any less of a person due to their cultural beliefs and practices. As scholar and writer, D’arcy McNickle would say, “use the white man’s technical skills for Indian purposes” (Iverson,
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