Native Practices: Questions On European Views Of Indian Sexuality

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QUESTIONS FOR COLUMBUS MEETS POCAHANTAS

Please ensure that you answer each of these words in substantive way – with at least three to four solid sentences. You must use your own words and show me you have understood the essay. If you merely copy from the text your score will be zerol

1. What Native practices regarding marriage, family, and male-female relations most influenced European views of Indian sexuality?

A. The Native practices that mostly influenced European’s views of Indian sexuality was the way natives split the duties for their family. For example, the men would hunt, while the women would stay and tend to the agricultural needs. Europeans thought differently since hunting to them was considered a sport and saw the Native men as being lazy. Another viewpoint was the idea of marriage. For instance, Native women were allowed to practice polygyny with certain
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Despite European opinion to the contrary, Indians did have strict moral codes regarding sexual behavior. What were they? In your view, why did Europeans fail to acknowledge them?

C. The strict moral codes that prohibited sexual behavior were not in their agriculture fields, when Native men were either planning for or coming from war, preparing for a ball game, not with a clan member, and if a Native woman is pregnant or during her period. Personally, it seemed that Europeans just wanted control and seized the moment because they did just came from a long ship journey with no females.

4. According to the author what were the basic attitudes of European men toward women in general? Do you agree?

D. European men believed that the work they did was more valuable then women’s. In addition, European men viewed women as property they can own; not thinking women has their own ideas. I do agree that the author portrayed the Europeans attitudes towards women in general as best as possible and personally don’t agree with it. Women should be considered equal, nothing more and nothing
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