Natural Born Killer Film Analysis

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As its name suggests postmodernism refers to a reaction to, as well as a certain rejection of modernism which contained an ‘optimistic belief in the benefits of science and technology to human kind’ (Hayward, 2000). Although postmodernism can never be clearly defined there are specific characteristics and techniques used in films that are attributed to the postmodern style of film-making. The film Natural Born Killers (1994) directed by Oliver Stone contains explicit examples of postmodern textual devices and the opening scene will be used as a case study illustrating the effectiveness and functions of such stylistic practices. In terms of visual techniques and cinematography the scene contains an intended reflection of a media consuming society. The first thing we hear is the song ‘Waiting for the Miracle’ by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame singer Leonard Cohen. Intercut between the wide shots in black-and-white of the typical American desert landscape are non-diegetic photos of a wolf and a poisonous snake that supposedly reside within that landscape. The screen then turns red before showing the picture of a…show more content…
This convention is drawn from the classical Hollywood melodrama or romance genre and it is not only used as a combined set of intertextual elements but it also shows the production elements on the set of the film. These combined elements drawn from other texts creates the new meaning of a more vicious modern day Bonnie and Clyde meant to mirror societies desire for violence. The scene in general blames society for numbing people to violence and encouraging the ‘endless circulation of commodities’ but through doing this it produces that commodity and has now been caught up in the commodification of

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