Natural Law And Augustine: Natural And Revealed Law

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Natural and Reveal Law are two types of laws from which substantial disputes and misunderstandings often arise. The basis of most discountenance frequently results from misinterpreting the meaning of the words "natural" and "reveal." A comprehensive analysis of these two common terms and their diversified interpretation is important in order to clarify their true meanings. Revealed Law or divine law, as the name imply, is revealed to mankind through the writings of the Holy Bible. Natural law, on the other hand, is an exemplary theory of legislation, which typifies the substructure for all human conducts. In order words, Natural Law represents the moral standards or ethical codes that regulate human actions. In the history of political philosophy,…show more content…
He believes that not only does eternal law that provide guidance regarding what men should do or avoid if they wish to be happy or good, but it also issues commands and prohibitions of actions that are not legitimate (Strass & Cropsey 1987, p. 186). Revealed Law, according to Augustine, finds its origin in God's revelation through the Bible. He believes that, to resist such law "is to defy God's own ordinance, inasmuch as civil society is intended by God Himself as a remedy for evil and is used by Him as an instrument of mercy in the midst of a sinful world" (Strauss & Cropsey 1987, p. 200). Chapter 13 of Apostle Paul's letter to the Romans starts out with these words: "Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established"(Romans 13:1, NIV). Augustine often refers to this particular passage in the Bible when talking about Revealed Law. Analyzing the underlying message in this particular Biblical passage makes it clear that his account of Revealed Law is one that is compatible Christian…show more content…
Having been adamant believers in such laws, the founding fathers thought the best way to protect the natural rights of American citizens was to establish laws that are in agreement with divine laws. They believed that God brought the world into being with series of principles by which it should be governed. From their perspective, the American people would not be able to continue to exist as an independent civilization without the protection of these principles. Thomas Jefferson, referring to Natural Law, wrote the following words in the Declaration of Independence: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" (The Declaration of Independence, U.S. 1776, para. 2). In writing those words in the Constitution, Jefferson believed that life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness were part of the human nature that every human being is entitled to. In James McClellan's book named Liberty, Order, and Justice, James Madison-the father and defender of the Constitution-claims the application of the Ten Commandments in the Constitutional Law of the United States as the best way in which the country will be able to sustain itself (p. 224). He saw the Ten Commandments as a set of unalterable laws that
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