Nature In The Iliad

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Myths are a medium by which people explain the world around them to younger generations. These myths generally explain how the world was formed and came to be. However, the teachings of each myth can be varied based on where they originated. If the myth came from a polytheistic culture, the myth may be more focus on the nature and ecological lessons. Likewise, if the myth came from a culture based on a monotheistic religion, the moral teaching may be focused more on humans, and moral development and choices. One of the myths studied is a very popular one, that is even commonly referenced in somewhat daily life; the story of Adam and Eve in “The Book of Genesis”. This story is widely known, and features in the beginning of The Bible. Another myth that deals with nature is the Iliad, written by Homer. This is another well-known text that talks about the interactions between nature and man, and how one affects the other in different kinds of ways. Both of these myths raise the question ‘Do these myths teach more about mankind, or ourselves? Or, do they teach us more about nature, and the essences of nature as a whole collective unit?” It is evident in these cases provided that myths tend to teach people more about mankind than they teach about nature. In the Iliad, this story focuses on the heroic Greek warrior, Achilles. Achilles is an unstoppable soldier that cannot be defeated in battle. This myth begins…show more content…
This excerpt of Achilles from the Iliad is supposed to show the moral lesson of knowing that man should know their place in the world, while also teaching the ecological lesson that nature must be respected in order for mankind to survive. Eisenberg also states the idea that as generations have passed, man has become less and less nature oriented, and the new thoughts have been shaped towards humans as a
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