Nature Of Love In Romeo And Juliet

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Juliet says, “My only love, sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, that I must love a loathed enemy,” (1.5.136-140), after realizing she has fallen in love with Romeo, a Montague. The feuding of their families does not allow Romeo and Juliet to be with one another, but in the end, their love is what eventually brings the feuding to end. In William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, the nature of Romeo and Juliet’s love is what leads to a paradigm changing tragedy. To begin with, the nature of Romeo and Juliet’s love allows them to rise above the feuding of their families. Their love is shown to be pure and all-consuming: “Amen, amen! But come what sorrow can, it cannot countervail the exchange of joy that one short minute gives me in her sight. Do thou but close our hands with holy words, then love-devouring death do what he dare, it is enough I may but call her mine,” (2.6.3-8). Romeo speaks these words to Friar Lawrence of Juliet, prior to their marriage. It shows the nature of their love, which is genuine. For these two characters love, not social status or lust, is the reward they seek. This love, not driven by any other needs, is what allows them to rise above the feuding of their families. Juliet tells Romeo to “doff thy name, and for thy name, which is no part of…show more content…
American novelist Thornton Wilder said, “All good things must come to an end, but all bad things continue forever.” In a way, this quote is evident in Romeo and Juliet. However, it also true that from these bad things, lessons are learned. These lessons taught through tragedy allow people to learn from their mistakes, and allow pure emotions, such as love, to exist in a nurturing and safe environment, one that Romeo and Juliet did not
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