Malala Yousafzai: A National Hero

980 Words4 Pages
Malala Yousafzai made history when she spoke at Canadian Parliament, not only because she became the youngest person to do so, but because she made a lasting impact on all who heard her. Despite her young age, her role as an activist for the right to education for girls, and her undying commitment to fight for that right has created a worldwide impact, touching the lives of millions. Since beginning her campaign, at just 11 years old, she has raised awareness and millions of dollars through the Malala Fund, become a published author, and the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She has been recognized as a hero and has been awarded a number of honours internationally, including an honourary Canadian Citizenship. It was upon receiving…show more content…
She begins by establishing herself as trustworthy, through her status as a respected and important individual. Her humble “accept[ance] of honourary citizenship to [Canada]” and remark on “meet[ing] [the] Prime Minister this morning” accomplishes this. When Malala speaks of the Prime Minister and her distinction she becomes associated with prestige and honour. Consequently, the audience respects her and is compelled to trust her. Malala then demonstrates her strength of character by showing her commitment to her cause. Malala’s mention of the “Malala Fund” and reference to “the man who shot [her]” for advocating girls’ education emphasizes her passion and devotion. Her dedication shows that she genuinely wants to make a difference. The audience recognizes her authenticity and believes her. Lastly, Malala discusses her life experiences, establishing her credibility. She states that she has “travelled the world and met people in many Countries. [She’s] seen firsthand many of the problems we are facing today-war, economic instability, climate change and health crises. And [she] can tell [them] the answer is girls”. The audience realizes that despite her youth, she is not naive. She is experienced, knowledgeable and in possession of valuable wisdom. In short, Malala successfully strengthens her argument by demonstrating her credibility, believability and…show more content…
Pathos is established when she addresses individuals and groups directly. Malala begins her speech by acknowledging “Mr. Prime Minister and Madame Gregoire Trudeau, Mr. Speaker, members of the House, members of the Senate, distinguished guests…people of Canada”. She follows by addressing “the children of Canada”, “Young women of Canada”, “Men of Canada” and the “leaders of Canada”. Malala’s recognition of each person and group directly evokes a feeling of importance, worth and belonging. Malala heightens this sense of belonging by referring to her audience as “sisters and brothers”. This inclusion of everyone makes her audience feel like they are equal and respected. Malala makes it clear that “we have a responsibility to improve our world”, uniting the audience in a feeling of solidarity and making them feel that they are part of something significant. In addition, Malala plays to the emotions of the audience to make her speech more effective and influential. She pleads with Canadians to “open… [their] hearts to the world’s most defenseless children and families”. By emphasizing the vulnerability of those children and families she creates feelings of sympathy and compassion in the audience. The audience may imagine their own families and children in that situation evoking empathy and
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