Nelson Mandela Biography

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a) A brief biography of Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela was born as Rolihlahla Mandela in the village of Mvezo on July 18th 1918 to Hendry Gadla Mandela, a tribal chief and councillor to the monarch, and his wife, Nosekeni. He spent his early years in the countryside helping his family to herd and take care of their livestock. When he began attending primary school, his teacher insisted that he must have a Christian name and he was given the name Nelson. His father passed away in 1927 and Mandela was sent to the royal court of Jongintaba Dalindyebo, the Regent of the Thembu, where he was raised and educated. After completing his secondary education, he began studying at the University College of Fort Hare but was expelled due to his involvement…show more content…
Mandela accepted the ambiguity of South African society during apartheid. He perceived the world in the way that it was and he knew that he would have to fight for equality rather than turn a blind eye and hope that things would improve. Other characteristics of self-actualization are a problem-centered outlook rather than a self-centered outlook, and a concern for the welfare of humanity (Maslow, 1971). During the entire time that Mandela was in prison, he never gave up the fight for the oppressed people. He was offered chances to gain his freedom from the government in exchange for ending his fight against the apartheid system but he refused. In one of his most famous speeches he declared that he was fighting a cause that he was prepared to die for. His refusal to accept injustice and inequality demonstrated his selflessness and patriotism towards the future of his…show more content…
This is an experience of being, distinguished by fulfilment and happiness due to a non-self-centered state of perfection and goal attainment (Atkinson, Atkinson, Smith and Bem, 1993). Mandela’s peak moment may have been the abolition of the apartheid system since he fought selflessly against this system for almost his entire life. It can be argued that Mandela did not experience the Jonah Complex since he certainly lived up to his fullest potential. Even when he was a prisoner, he never doubted his capabilities or believed that he should stop fighting for what he believed in. He was never diminished and his moral leadership continued to grow and develop. His accomplishments benefited the lives of an entire country and he was resilient and persistent in his fight for
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