New Boston Fair

1718 Words7 Pages
The 33rd annual Fair at New Boston was an outdoor, living history event held on Labor Day weekend at George Rogers Clark Park in Springfield, Ohio. The two day only event was open to the public for a reasonable admission fee, and was sponsored by a diverse group of prominent companies and local businesses, which included Red Lobster, Hampton by Hilton, Young’s Jersey Dairy, Indian Creek Distillery, and Champion City Cross Fit. Moreover, the Fair at New Boston’s extensive roster included battle reenactments, military tactical demonstrations, historical impressions and character interpretations, archery matches, puppeteering, theatre, music, and dance performances, and numerous medicinal, trade, craft, and art exhibits. Therefore, under the earnest…show more content…
However, the event also provided an informative glimpse into various facets of early American life. The grounds of George Rogers Clark Park were studded with picturesque display tents, soldier and civilian camps, and a woodland Native American village. The event also included a reenactment of the 1780 Battle of Peckuwe, which was the largest Revolutionary War battle west of the Allegheny Mountains. It is important to note that there is a direct correlation between George Rogers Clark Park, the Battle of Peckuwe, and the fair’s Kispoko Native American village site. Peckuwe and Kispoko were the names of two Native American settlements that were constructed by the Shawnee on land that included a part of what is now George Rogers Clark Park. Thus, the Battle of Peckuwe, fought primarily between Kentucky militiamen under George Rogers Clark and the Shawnee, took place on the grounds surrounding the park and Fair at New Boston event. Additionally, the Fair at New Boston is named after a village once located near the site of the event, known as Boston, or New…show more content…
The cannons flanking the battlefield were impressive replicas of the mobile, light, 6-pound, British Field Cannon. They rested on wooden and iron gun carriages, and were fired periodically throughout the day, causing a mixture of momentary panic and excitement among the general public. Furthermore, the military encampment site revealed a wealth of information regarding the supplies and personal effects of the soldiers who participated in late eighteenth century military campaigns. For example, one of the individual soldier tents contained a sewing kit, pewter tankard, stockings, haversack, letters, coarse blanket, and sleeping pallet. Additionally, the military encampment site included several “camp follower” tents for women who were hired by the army as laundresses and seamstresses, and an informative display table of various naval and army weapons, grapeshot, Scottish style shoe buckles, tools, and sewing
Open Document