New Deal Dbq

1213 Words5 Pages

The Great Depression was an impactful tragedy in the United States of America that was responsible in taking millions of citizens from work, bankrupting small businesses to large corporations, and leading to decreased consumer spending and investments. It brought may citizens onto the street and singled out the very few of the rich. The Depression was a result of the stock market crash, billions of dollars in value were completely wiped out in less than one day, and investors lost the life time’s worth of money. In the very beginning of this period President Herbert Hoover and his administration attempted to lower the impact of the depression on the citizens of America, but they had failed to do so, and in fact made it even worse on the …show more content…

Roosevelt had stated that he would help “the forgotten man at the bottom of the economic pyramid” and by doing so he raised the hopes of the American people toward a new and yet powerful democratic nation. As president he challenged congress and introduced what would be known as the New Deal to the American people. It was a set of domestic policies that would greatly expand the role of the federal government in the regular everyday economy in response to the Great Depression. The New deal brought programs and reliefs into many sectors of the economy. The Civilian Conservation Corps, or the CCC, was one of the prominent programs enacted by the New Deal. This program was responsible in providing means of employment for many Americans through the depression. The CCC built many public institutions, infrastructure, and improved many national parks across America, and it was also similar to the Civil Works Administration, which mostly concentrated on construction, rather than toward national parks. Another example of a program instilled by the New Deal that proved to be a major step in recovery was of the Federal Housing Administration, or the FHA. This program attacked the housing problem of the …show more content…

In this he created the WPA, or the Works Progress Administration as a way to provide a higher amount of jobs for the unemployed individuals. The WPA was not given authority to challenge private industries and businesses, so instead the focused more on building infrastructure, such as highways and bridges. It also established more public institutions, such as schools, post offices, and recreational parks. A second approach he took consisted of passing the National Labor Relations act, also known as the Wagner Act, which prevented the unfair treatment of workers by businesses during the recession. It can be seen that Roosevelt’s aggressive touch to his New Deal plan was centered around providing means of work, especially those geared around progressing America in technology and developing this nation. Not only was Roosevelt thinking to end the Great Depression, but also by making sure that America’s future would not be affected by his prior

Open Document