Women In The Great Gatsby

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As indicated in the title, the new woman is a literally different type of woman who has changed in every aspect of her life. She is a well-educated, free spirited and independent woman figure. She has changed the traditional ideas about ideal womanhood in the late 19th century. Because until this time, the woman was only a mother and wife in the public eye. Her all responsibilities and duties were being consisted by her husband, her children and housework. For example, bearing and nursing children are unchangeable characteristics of woman but raising children and the things that are done within this progress are the duties of both parents. The Woman, again, was seen as a weak, sensitive and emotional figure in the society. She was always ignored…show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald portrayed new woman in a more modern and realistic way. After World War I, the role of women as housewives and mothers changed. They had to work and to earn their own money which provides an independent life to them. They also started to vote and so, they were accepted as equal members of society. However, this power changed women’s behaviors totally. They started drinking, smoking and dancing. In the novel, The Great Gatsby, the different characteristics of new women are presented through Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker and Myrtle Wilson. They are all different versions of the New Woman. Fitzgerald presents quite contrasting roles for women in The Great Gatsby in 1920, creating distinct challenges between new woman and traditional woman. For example, Jordan Baker is an arrogant, unemotional and often irresponsible woman. She is an independent young woman and throughout the novel Nick stresses that she is very modern emancipated woman. She has sportive life, and she mostly wears sports clothes. Because of her masculine style, it is implied that she has lost her femininity. Daisy Buchanan almost embodies values of new woman, too. She is very irresponsible and impartial. Her irresponsibility can be understood in her treatment of her daughter and also from her actions. However, it is clear that Daisy stucks between old and new values and she can not break out. The third woman, Myrtle has strong desires about Tom and she uses her sexuality in order to impress him. But she never goes beyond being only Tom’s
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