Nietzsche Self Reflection

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Years before, I was truly inspired and motivated by a book titled “When Nietzsche wept”to explore in more depth the field of psychology as a science. Through the plot, the particular book introduced to me some basics concepts of psychology and may triggered some questions of mine. After a short period of time and some research, I enrolled in an undergraduate program of Psychology as I found it to be quite a stimulating science for me. Recently, I noticed that the writer of this book is Irving Yalom, a well-known and awarded by American Psychology Association, founder of existential psychotherapy. As a humanistic approach, existential therapeutic process and existential theory as a whole found to be quite familiar to me and may reflected…show more content…
A key concept of Person-centered therapy is trust towards individuals ' ability to work in a beneficial way for self-fullfillment and autonomy, if current conditions provoke this self-growth process. This particular directional process towards “self-maturity” is formally defined as “actualizing tendency”; which for me is a quite inspiring and positive view that holds the belief that people have an inner capacity of self-healing and replenishing possible maladjustment without implying a movement away from interpersonal relationships and interdependence (Broadley, 1999). Personal thoughts of mine reflect the same point of view; one can heal himself/herself and realize his/her self-fulling life goals if there is qualitative time and qualitative thinking and try in his/her life. Firstly, by replenishing facades and progressively, by dealing with his 'her dysfunctional and “unwanted” emotions and behaviors. With the same perspective, PCT therapy relies on the assumption that people are already aware of the factors in their lives that makes them unhappy. When there are conditions of self-growth they can face these factors more efficiently (Corey…show more content…
A major limitation of person-centered therapy is that it is not emphasizes on the role of techniques. “ Those who call for accountability as defined by evidence-based practices within the field on mental health are also quite critical of the experiential approaches” (Corey G, 2009). Furthermore, a main limitation of person-centered therapy reflects on the therapist 's own limitations. Failing to be genuine, caring, supportive, empathetic and warm; or even failing to be in real touch with the clients on a moment-by moment experience are not only limitations of the process but surely can have a great impact on the outcomes (Bohart, 2003). Indeed, the above limitation is not only a person-centered therapy limitation but for me a basic need for all mental health professionals and therapists. For many therapists, being yourself in a therapeutic session might be difficult to achieve because of external influences, professionalism and safety reasons, but for me it is a matter of trust. Hierarchically first, by being human and then a mental health professional, you set the basis for a trustful and meaningful conversation where the client can feel safe and discuss progressively problems that “nobody wants to hear”. I truly believe, that there are many things in life that you can achieve without pre-established techniques, one of these may be to achieve self-growth conditions through Person Centered Therapy. Humanistic approach for me is a way of life and a way of
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