Nietzsche's Theory Of Nihilism

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Introduction Fredrick Nietzsche, a German philosopher who came before such varied phenomena as Nazism and postmodernism supported the concepts of individualism, self-reliance, competition, and elitism (Scott, 2014). These are the three terms that sum up the motives for the ongoing controversy over his theories, and the result of Nietzsche questioning the theory of nihilism (Scott, 2014). Nihilism is the understanding the higher values that people and society have undervalued themselves, by which they have become insignificant and outdated. It is the loss of all importance, sense, and purpose (Moroney, 1986). Nihilism is a rational result of corruption, corruption is an inevitable fact of life. In this assignment Nietzsche’s views on nihilism…show more content…
Nietzsche thought that Christian morals guided European humanity for the last 1,500 years (Bishop, 2012). Europeans had to make a noteworthy choice regarding the last man and the superman, between a realistic society dedicated to complete contentment or a higher but sad culture with superhuman possibilities (Bishop, 2012). Christianity was the first against particle and theoretical nihilism. Christianity gave purpose to people’s lives by granting them an absolute value, Christianity was able to explain and justify the evil and suffering in the world (Moroney, 1987). As time went by the spirit of truthfulness sprang from Christianity and eventually gave way to the rise of nihilism as people began to question the notion of God and the whole Christian culture (Moroney, 1987). Nihilism is unavoidable and, in spite of its destructive aspect, it can be rejuvenating, and consequently beneficial experience (Moroney, 1987). When Nietzsche says that nihilism can be beneficial and rejuvenating for Europe it is active complete nihilism that he is talking…show more content…
As a result, this brings us to believe that our freedom can release us from our traditional values. Once they have been revealed of their false and demeaning motives. Furthermore, as a result of this freedom and independence, new values develop (Mandic, 2011). This position failed on any belief of being responsive to circumstances we find ourselves in. The notion of liberty and the feeling of independence that follows from it is almost an unfeasible way for an individual to live their life. It leaves an individual without a sense of unity and belonging with others. (Mandic,
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