North Korean Gender Roles

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The values of North Korean society are further demonstrated through the way in which men and women are portrayed. There are clear gender roles established at the beginning as Un is seen by Gyong Chan and Nam Chol, the chauffeur for the head of the research institute, as bossy and overdramatic when she brings them to Traffic Controller Office for breaking the traffic laws. Even though they broke the rules, they don’t believe they need to punished for it and are visibly annoyed when she punishes them for their actions. Un is in a role of power in the film, but that power is repeatedly undermined throughout the film. When her mother finds out that Un ticketed a family friend, she questions her decision and suggests to her daughter that she try…show more content…
The dynamic for marriage shown in this film further enforces these traditional gender roles. There is a scene in which Nam’s mother talks about how he must not marry the girl he is currently engaged to because his fiancé is an only child and therefore would need Nam to move into her place. Since Nam’s mother is ill and unable able to live on her own, she wants Nam to marry a woman who has siblings so that they can both come live with her. This shows the lack of control daughters have over where they live and even who they eventually marry. Sons are seen as more valuable in this society and that is why the woman traditionally moves into her husband’s house and not vice…show more content…
The fact that the North Korean government feels they must produce films with multiple layers of propaganda for their own citizens implies that they are worried about their level of control over their people. They need to constantly enforce their values, through varying degrees of brainwashing, in order to maintain a certain level of control over their own society. This means that the values portrayed in the film are not intrinsic to the society and thus the government’s power over their society are formed inorganically. North Korea clearly values blind obedience to rules as an important aspect of their society, they need their citizens to believe the rules set in place for them are in order to protect them and not hurt them. Korean politics employ the use of soft power on a grand scale, not just through films but also through the use of mass games, memorabilia, and other ways to shape its citizens
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