November 11 And Acceptance For Today's Honor Veterans

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November 11 is one of the few holidays held in observation for U.S. military participants in which they're praised and appreciated for their service and sacrifice for our country. The vast majority of today's civilians honor veterans through ovations at parades and commemorative events around America but we must remember serving in the military isn't a wonderful experience veterans undergo. They may inclusively be considered heroes because they've risked their lives to protect our country but is it appropriate to call veterans heroes? Our expression of gratitude for their service isn't sufficient to truly display our respect because after all, we, the public lack empathy to understand a veteran's experience at war, establishing a present gap …show more content…

Every time Veterans Day is forthcoming we demonstrate our gratitude for their service but ultimately some war veterans define it as inadequate. An Iraq war veteran, Wes Moore, in Ted Talks, expresses how the phrase "Thank you for your service" which many civilians would utter was an ambiguous statement to him. Upon his return from war, the multiple occasions he encountered the statement, it was just a simple meaningless phrase. The phrase just meant his service at war was pointless because people only conveyed their gratefulness but never asked about his experience at war or how was he after the war. Praising a veteran who participated in the military isn't enough of an appreciation for many veterans because revealing the term "Thank you for your service" is an awkward comment that rather of expressing a sincere gratitude, instead exhibits how many individuals deliver this statement not because they genuinely mean it but because it's the appropriate deed to …show more content…

David Kok, a former Sergeant in the Marine Corp infantry, who was an assault man in the Iraq War—specialized in explosive, rockets, and other destructive devices—said, "every soldier undergoes an extensive training based on the timeframe one will be deployed which is a physical and mental preparation for what is to come." Therefore, they're conscience of what is deemed to occur at warfare so "the conflict is more about how veterans cope with their war experience after returning to civilian life." Returning to a civilian life for David Kok wasn't straightforward because the loss of an established support network with soldiers he befriended isn't the same after returning home. His support network lives among the different states of the United States so his friends became the friends he left behind before deploying but, they won't understand what he underwent during

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