Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Study

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Overview Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is recognized within the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders as a mental disorder involving obsessive thoughts and repetitive behavior. The cause of obsessive-compulsive disorder is not definitively known however several theories ranging from genetics to environment have been proposed and supported. There are several treatment options for managing obsessive-compulsive disorder including medications, psychotherapy, surgery and ECT. There are several comorbid disorders associated with the disorder, most of which may develop due to dealing with the chronic symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, and a couple related disorders which have symptoms similar in nature to those…show more content…
Additional changes include further clarification into the level of insight a person with obsessive-compulsive disorder has toward their obsessive-compulsive beliefs ranging from good/fair to absent/delusional insight. The clarification was made to distinguish the difference between good/fair insight, where an individual would think their obsessive-compulsive beliefs were most likely not true, and poor insight, where an individual would think their obsessive-compulsive beliefs were most likely true. Another change to the chapter of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders is the addition of two new diagnoses including excoriation disorder, which is also known as skin-picking, and hoarding disorder. Hoarding disorder can be a symptom of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder and is described as being an excessive accumulation of possessions due to an unwillingness to part with said items. Severe hoarding behavior can happen when an individual also has obsessive-compulsive disorder (Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders - DSM-5,…show more content…
Those who have experienced physical, emotional, or sexual abuse are at greater risk to develop obsessive-compulsive disorder. Grisham et al. (2011) found that even the type of abuse could predict future obsessive-compulsive behaviors such as verbal insults leading to ordering compulsions or recurrent shameful thoughts. The theory of a physiological component to the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder is supported in a 2012 review by Milad and Rauch. The researchers found that an impairment or abnormality in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and striatum could lead to a development of of obsessive-compulsive
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