Odysseus Relationship With The Gods In Homer's The Odyssey

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Although The Odyssey has many themes taught throughout it, there are three that really stood out to me. The most obvious theme was an individual’s relation with the gods and trying to satisfy the gods. Another important theme was human relations: the struggle within them and how love can drive someone. Finally, the last big theme is growth and initiation. The Odyssey teaches many interesting themes all through the book.
I believe the most evident theme was an individual's relation with the gods. “No, it’s the Earth-shaker, Poseidon, unappeased, forever fuming against him for the cyclops whose giant eye he blinded…” (Zeus/page 79/lines 81-83). This piece of evidence proves that Odysseus’ relationship with Poseidon is very poor. Poseidon
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When Calypso is asking Odysseus why he doesn’t love her, he responds with,”’Nevertheless I long-I pine, all my days-to travel home and see the dawn of my return,’” (Odysseus/page 159/lines 242-243). This quote proves that Odysseus’ love for Penelope is a main part of what drives him to return to Ithaca. Had Penelope been dead or non existent, Odysseus may have not wanted to return home. When Odysseus is talking to Penelope as a beggar, he tells her,”’I have heard that Odysseus now, at last, is on his way…’” (Odysseus/page 399/line 310). Odysseus tells this to Penelope to see if she is still in love with him. The way she responded to the news would give Odysseus his answer. This was a struggle in Penelope and Odysseus’…show more content…
While Odysseus is away, Telemachus has been developing and learning how to be a man, with the help of Athena. The first time Telemachus shows how mature he is when he first confronts the suitors. He tells them,”’You must leave my palace! See to your feasting elsewhere…’” (Telemachus/page 89/line 430). By telling the suitors to leave, Telemachus proves how much he has grown. Another instance where Telemachus shows his maturity is when he calls the assembly about the suitors. “When’d they’d grouped, crowding the meeting grounds, Telemachus strode in too, a bronze spear in his grip…” (page 93/lines 9-10). This piece of evidence shows how Telemachus is growing up. Him calling an assembly shows how he is using the power he has to try and take control of the situation.
The Odyssey teaches many important themes. The most apparent theme is an individual’s relation to the gods. In addition, a human's’ relations and the struggles within them is another central theme. Finally, growth and initiation is a very essential theme. All of these themes are very meaningful to the Ancient
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