Oedipus Rex Fate Vs Free Will

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In the tragedy Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles. Oedipus just wanted to help but fate has other plans for him as well as other characters. When he finds his true identity, the terrible fate beats him down and takes his vision. Such a tragedy to spawn a hated generation, marry his mother, and kill his father, just as the oracle had predicted. One character 's destiny, Laius, was controlled by fate. His destiny has been foretold by an oracle which claims that his son will one day murder him. The prophecy stated, His oracle was simplified to, “One which said he’d kill his parents.” (26) At that state of risk he leaves his son, but did the oracle predict right? It seems so, since Oedipus murders a group which was told to be Laius’ group. “I lifted my own staff and hit him back. He rolled to the ground away from the carriage, flat on his back. Then, as I fought on, I killed the rest of the men.”(17) Oedipus had been ticked off when one of the men hit him with a staff on the head, “for that little act, he paid double” If only Oedipus had known that was his father. Laius’ fate may…show more content…
The third character’s destiny, Oedipus, was foretold ever since he was a teen. Oedipus’ prophecy is slightly different. When Oedipus is raised by King Polybus and Queen Merope, he is given a prophecy by Apollo, “Apollo told me all sorts of other horrible, dreadful prophecies; prophecies like, one day I’d become my mother’s husband, and that I’d spawn a generation rejected by mankind, and that I’d murder my father!” (17) Oedipus finds this out when he asks Apollo after a drunk had told him Polybus and Merope weren 't his birth parents. When the horrible truth of his mom being his wife and having spawn with her fall upon him, he stabs out his own eyes. “Oedipus removed the bejewelled, golden brooches from Jocasta’s shoulders and plunged them deep into the sockets of his own eyes!” (28) Oedipus can’t stand the humiliation, so this is the option he is left with. Fate then leads him out of the
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