Call Of The Wild: Transcendentalism

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Literature Victoria Class One Final Walden, Of Mice and Men, and The Call of the Wild are masterpieces of Transcendentalism, about Existentialism, about Naturalism, and Human Nature. Walden is Thoreau’s self-reflection for spiritual quests while immersing in nature. Through a simplified lifestyle, Thoreau illustrates ideas about individualism versus social existence, self-reliance, and meditations of opposing to Materialism. Of Mice and Men superficially reflects a story that two migrant ranch hands search for job opportunities by moving from place to place. Instead, it portrays an inevitable tragedy of the ending, depending on existentialism. The Call of the Wild is a novel about a dog is named Buck, who is compelled to grow up,…show more content…
For example, Steinbeck portrays Lennie as an animal: "walking heavily, dragging his feet a little, the way a bear drags his paws," Dragging his "paws" like a "bear" depicts an image of a big stature with mental disability, who sluggishly prods along. Previously, Lennie's relationship with the little animals also plays an important role in the story. He is quite obsessed with getting them because softness provides himself a sense of comfort. Unlike his robust body, Lennie is weak at heart, unable to follow sophisticated social rules. Accordingly, living a natural life is impossible for Lennie, who is forced to earn money in a capital society. Certainly, Steinbeck uses the imagery to make a foreseen tragedy for what Lennie does and show the survival of the fittest – the societal structure controls the…show more content…
Thoreau uses the metaphor of transcendentalism to suggest the importance of finding inner self; Steinbeck utilizes imagery of existentialism to foreshadow the tragedy of the ending; London illustrates symbolism of naturalism to describe aboriginal instincts. Among three masterpieces, Thoreau illustrates some examples of rebirth considering the transcendental concept -- looking of nature, and eventually states the metaphor as internal growth, building a better self; Steinbeck uses the imagery to make a foreseen tragedy for what Lennie does and to show the survival of the fittest – the social structure controls the individuals; London argues an incisive consideration the underlying symbolism of primitive instincts and eventually, he combines with the naturalism and shows the ancestral memory beneath our civilization. Three great writers create a worldview between human and
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