Of The Flies: Policy And Programmatic Implications, By William Golding

774 Words4 Pages

Since the dawn of time, countless expectations, assumptions, and stereotypes pertaining to innumerable groups of people have existed. A particularly pervasive example would include traditional ideals of what a “true” man is. The standards of being that society has implemented in growing boys are defining factors of their behavior throughout their lives. In the academic essay “Addressing Gender Socialization and Masculinity Norms Among Adolescent Boys: Policy and Programmatic Implications,” by Avni Amin et al., the causes and consequences of the traditional gender norms are addressed. In William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies, the boys on the island consistently perpetuate the manly criteria that are only intensified by their relationships …show more content…

As stated by Amin et al., “As boys transition into adolescence…Male peers contribute to the upholding of prevailing masculinity norms by challenging each other physically and verbally or encouraging risk-taking practices” (3). In Golding’s novel, the boys take part in many risks as a result of each other’s encouragement, even if it is against their better judgment. For example, when they debate on visiting the ostensible beast on the mountain and Piggy queries “‘Couldn't we--kind of--stay here? Maybe the beast won't come near us.’ But for the sense of something watching them, Ralph would have shouted at him…” (Golding …show more content…

As stated by Amin, et al., “Changing masculinity norms requires… addressing the social ridicule and stigmatization of those that fail to live up to ideals of masculinity” (5). Piggy is consistently a target of cruel jokes from the boys on the island as a result of his non-intrepid behavior and unorthodox appearance. In the novel, it is revealed that “Piggy was a bore; his fat, his ass-mar and his matter-of-fact ideas were dull, but there was always a little pleasure to be got out of pulling his leg, even if one did it by accident” (Golding 65). Satisfaction and joy are derived from jeering at Piggy due to his dull personality and atypical physical appearance. This solidifies the notion that the cruel treatment toward Piggy is simply a result of the laddish standards being upheld by those on the

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