One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest By Ken Kesey

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R.P. McMurphy exemplifies a modern day tragic hero in Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. McMurphy follows the traditional outline of a tragic hero in that he has a fatal flaw, a reversal of fortune due to this flaw, and experiences his own downfall due to his fatal flaw. R.P. McMurphy’s biggest flaw was his insubordination. McMurphy’s insubordination was exemplified when he first arrived on the ward, and demanded to see the “bull goose loony.” He surely became the bull goose loony, as he made a bet that he could bother Nurse Ratched without getting into any real trouble. McMurphy’s antics gave the patients not only a good laugh, but some hope. McMurphy began to really care about the patients, and began to question Ratched in larger …show more content…

This point intensified the conflict between Ratched and McMurphy. He began to hate her absolute …show more content…

McMurphy’s insubordination would lead him to throw a party, which would solidify his fate. McMurphy decided to throw a party on the ward, while the nurses and aids were out, with help from a janitor. McMurphy was able to sneak in Candy and Sandy, with some alcohol. McMurphy orchestrated this event so that Billy could be set up with Candy, which McMurphy thinks would be better for him than any of Nurse Ratched’s “pecking parties.” The Janitor was suppose to wake up McMurphy before the staff came in, so that McMurphy and the girls could escape. The Janitor does not wake-up, and the staff comes in the next morning to the huge mess. They see the girls McMurphy has brought in, and that Billy had slept with one of them. Ratched threatens to tell Billy’s mom. Billy begs for her not to do so, but Ratched refuses. Billy then kills himself. When the men find Billy in the doctor’s office, McMurphy gets so angry he strangles Nurse Ratched, attempting to kill her. This act of aggression leads to McMurphy’s

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