Orientalism In The Philippines

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Chapter 1 A discursive on minority studies would suggest that power in the form of knowledge was what created hegemony. So also when we look at the colonial discourse, we have come to an understanding or rather it is understood that one of the pertaining factor that sustained the domination over the colonies was ‘power’ in the form of knowledge. That very knowledge further gave the colonizers the power to ‘represent’ the colonized. Edward Said says, Orientalism is the colonizers way of, “dealing with the Orient by making statements about it, authorizing views of it, describing it, teaching it, ruling over it,” or rather, “Orientalism as a Western style for dominating, restructuring and having authority over the Orient.” (3) However even…show more content…
And how through such objectification, they subjugated the natives, I will be arguing how surveys conducted on language were used as tools to further their dominance. I will be looking at a specific region and further try to bring out the various ways in which the British administrators tried to represent the languages of that region and thereby exercising their control over the area. By taking a reconnaissance on the languages of the Ao Nagas by the colonizers I would like to contemplate on how language was perceived and how it changed after the colonial intervention among the Ao…show more content…
“However, the introduction of writing was not always a straightforward case of introducing a script to a language which did not have one, or giving people their first ever experience of reading and writing.” (Talib 71) In this case it was precisely for proselytizing the natives. Prior to which, the day to day life was imparted through the oral form, which was transmitted from one generation to the other. Roman script was used while standardizing Chungli, since there was no script of the Aos prior to it. But there are various myths that surround that, the Aos did have a script of their own, a tradition which can be traced among other Naga tribes as well as many other tribes from other parts of the world. According to one, since it was written on the animal skin, they cooked it up and ate it up. While another anecdote says that it was the dogs that ate the skin in the absence of its master. Stuart Blackburn mentions about this story of lost writing in “Unscripted: The People of Arunachal Pradesh in Literary and Other National Histories.” He cites that such an anecdote not only speaks of their contact with writing through contact with others who already had inculcated the art of writing. But it also speaks about writing which might have been there in the past which has been lost in the
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