PTSD In Military

2243 Words9 Pages
Do you have any family in the military? Maybe a mom, dad, cousin, family member. Maybe you know someone that has a military based family? Every year more than 180,000 people enlist in the armed forces. Being deployed isn’t just hard on military personnel but also their surroundings including their loved ones and more. As one returns from deployment it’s a tough transition. You have to reestablish yourself and reconnect with your family. People come back changed and develop new ways and things think differently.The distance caused by the time away and the soldier 's inability to leave the trauma and mindset of combat behind them can make the return home from combat stressful and difficult for both the soldier and family. That 's why…show more content…
Both enlisted and officer careers provide rewarding experiences, educational and training benefits, and competitive compensation. About 6 of every 10 of men and 5 of every 10 of women experience at least one trauma in their lives. Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.The 2014 JAMA Psychiatry study found the rate of PTSD in the military to be five times higher than civilians. When you are in the military, you may see combat. You may have been on missions that exposed you to horrible and life-threatening experiences. You may have been shot at, seen a buddy get shot, or seen death. These types of events can lead to PTSD. The 2014 JAMA Psychiatry study found the rate of PTSD to be 15 times higher than…show more content…
PTSD affects everyone differently and in different ways from numbing people to causing violence. Individuals with PTSD are not dangerous. Although PTSD is associated with an increased risk of violence, the majority of Veterans and non-Veterans with PTSD have never engaged in violence. When other factors like alcohol and drug misuse, additional psychiatric disorders, or younger age are considered, the association between PTSD and violence is decreased.Individuals with PTSD have an elevated prevalence of risk factors that are associated with increased violence, such as substance misuse and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Because of this, findings regarding the relationship between PTSD and violence should be interpreted cautiously if they are based on analyses that do not take risk factors other than PTSD into account. For example, in one study of Veterans who served post-9/11, PTSD when examined on its own was associated with an increased risk of violence. However, when alcohol misuse was statistically controlled, PTSD was no longer associated with an
Open Document