Participation In Politics

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SINGLE–GENDER SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT FOR ADOLESCENT GIRLS: A VEHICLE FOR WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT AND PARTICIPATION IN POLITICS IN GHANA
CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
Obviously, participation in formal education should be strongly associated with political participation for women and for men. The outcome of decades of research into the factors influencing women and men’s engagement with politics in the USA, concluded that education is an especially powerful predictor of political participation (Burns, Schlozman and Verba 2001:286). A wide range of positive externalities of formal education are known to relate to political participation. In addition to its intrinsic value such as the joy derived from learning, reading, solving problems, etc. education has
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It has been observed that even in the industrialized democracies where a greater number of women have attained heights in education and are highly represented in the work force, and in professional positions there is persistently low numbers of women in formal politics. In 2012 just 18.3% of people in the United States Congress were women (www.ipu.org/wmn-e/classif.htm Inter-Parliamentary Union, 2014). This contrast suggests that the connection between education and engagement in formal representative politics is not directly observable, and invites an exploration into the nature of the relationship between women’s education and political…show more content…
Sax L. (2009) while examining the impact of single-gender schooling on the academic achievement of adolescent girls in the United States, among other benefits reported that alumnae of girls’ schools were more likely to engage in political and social activism than their co-educational counterparts of the same economic and social backgrounds.
However, it is worth noting that a greater number of women who have gained prominence in politics worldwide had either had early life single-gender school experience or sorority group experience. For instance, of the 17 women senators in the US Congress in 2009, 35 % had attended single-gender schools and another 23.53 % who attended coeducational high schools had been members of sorority groups. Similarly, the handful of women that have featured prominently in global politics are known to have had girlhood single-gender school experience. Notable among these, to name few, are Magdalene Albright, Hillary Clinton, Condoleeza Rice, Margaret Thatcher, Angela Merkel, etc.
These observations give inkling into what may be an effective vehicle of delivering education to girls to ensure that the benefits translate into women’s political

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