Characteristics Of Utopian Communities

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First name Las tname Instructor’s Name Course Number Date Final Utopian Communities – about 100 reform communities established before the Civil War. Each of them pretended to be the model of a perfect society, which, however, could hardly be turned into reality. Each of these communities had its own structure and motivation. Some of them were established on the basis of authoritarian system with strong leader, while others operated in a democratic fashion. Some of them were religious, and the others were inspired by the desire to implement their own economic models. The similar feature of all Utopian communities was their intention to build the society on a cooperative basis and to narrow the gap between poor and rich. Cooperation principle…show more content…
It was totally corresponding to hierarchical, agrarian society in which the master was the head of the system and had a right to the labor of the slave, but the slave, in turn, also had a right of protection, the right of counsel and guidance, the right of subsistence, the right of care and attention in sickness and old age. Paternalistic view had been a feature of American slavery even in the eighteenth century. Understanding of this concept is extremely important, as paternalism was an instrument of masking and justifying the reality of slavery, which enabled slaveholders to think of themselves as responsible and even kind people, who take care of their property, even though their property is…show more content…
Slavery influenced the American political development, its economy, culture and its fundamental principles. There is no denying that for most of the US history the American society was the society of slaveholders and slaves. First of all, it should be emphasized that the American economy was founded on the basis or tobacco, rice, sugar and cotton trade. All these products were slave-grown, and even though this kind of manufacturing process cannot be estimated as positive, it enabled slaveholders to bring capital into the colonies and the American republic, which became the basis of the American infrastructure for at least three following centuries. Particularly, cotton had become by far the most important commodity in international trade, as the Old South supplied around three-fourths of the world’s cotton. The largest countries, such as Great Britain, France and Russia depended on this supply. Furthermore, it was cotton capital that allowed the US to pay for imported manufactured goods manufactured goods. However, slave-based manufacturing also led to the appearance of a huge gap between South and North, because South with its slaveholders and slaves remained rather agrarian than industrial territory, because slavery was limiting the growth of industry, discouraging immigrants from entering the region, and inhibiting technological progress. Consequently, slavery had a huge impact on American economic
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