The Rise Of Federalism

800 Words4 Pages
After the Articles of Confederation, which did not hold up the United States, the Constitution was born. The Constitution introduced federalism as a way to divide the powers between the national and state governments. It has issued the balance that the United States has needed since 1787. Without federalism, all branches of government would abuse their power over many political decisions. The path of federalism was supported by eighty-five essays and articles written by James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton. James Madison wrote the tenth and fifty-first federalist paper. Federalist paper number fifty one speaks about the branches of government and who should get more power. It is seen that the legislative branch predominates. In order…show more content…
The executive branch, and the judicial branch, each having to pass on something before it can be final. Some of the powers the branches had were, the enumerated powers meaning that seventeen powers that article 1,section 8 of the Constitution specifically grants to congress, the reserved powers in which under the tenth amendment, the powers not delegated to the U.S. by the Constitution, or prohibited by it to the states, that are reserved to the states or to the people, and the necessary and proper clause is the final clause of Article 1,section 8, of the Constitution, which empowers congress to make all laws “necessary and proper” for carrying out the federal government's duties. This is the Constitutional basis for implied powers. The delegated powers are assigned to the federal government. The concurred powers allow both federal and state government to share the power. Each of these set limits as to what the national government and the state government can do. With dual federalism, the national government would be in charge of foreign affairs, national security, and other national relations. This action left the states any domestic policy issues, thus, separating the powers of a national government and a state government (Bessette). Without these limitations, many political decisions might be unconstitutional…show more content…
According to the article “The Founders and Federalism”, creating a federalist government helps “avoid tyranny, allow more participation in politics, elect both state and national officials to increase the input of citizens into their government, prohibited powers are denied either to the national government, state governments, or both (Article I, Section 9.)” (“The Founders…”). “The Constitution is not perfect” as George Washington said, but in the words of the preamble, it is the next step in a “more perfect union” (“Federalism”). The Articles of confederation lasted one year before the U.S. noticed it wasn't fair for their government. There wasn't enough power in the federal government, hence,they didn't have the power to tax or regulate trade. Due to the way the powers were divided before the Constitution, the U.S. fought a war because of tyranny and the fears of a powerful central government. However, soon enough, a civil war broke out between the states. The southern states had formed the confederate states due to their support for slavery. Many of the large populated states “exercised more power in Congress”, the states that kept slavery had the “three-fifths of their enslaved population for representation and taxation purposes” (“Federalism”). Without this compromise, it would have given the slave states more political
Open Document